1621 Gunter Ave Guntersville , AL 35976 256-486-3755

1970

Chevrolet

Camaro

Z28

27,328

Automatic

124870N532367

CDLL201852

350 360 HP

Vinyl

Yellow

2WD

American Muscle Car

AL


Estimated By E.P.A.
City
0
Hwy
0
Actual Mileage May Vary

Vehicle Options



Vehicle Description


1970 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 (second generation)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The second-generation Chevrolet Camaro was produced by Chevrolet from 1970 through the 1981 model years. It was introduced in the spring of 1970[1] Build information for model 123-12487[2] was released to the assembly plants in February of that same year. It was longer, lower, and wider than the first generation Camaro. A convertible body-type was no longer available.[3] GM engineers have said the second generation is much more of "A Driver's Car" than its predecessor.

Overview
Dubbed "Super Hugger",[1] the second-generation Camaro was developed without the rush of the first generation and benefited from a greater budget justified by the success of the first generation.[citation needed] Although it was an all-new car, the basic mechanical layout of the new Camaro was familiar, engineered much like its predecessor with a unibody structure utilizing a front subframe, A-arm and coil spring front suspension, and rear leaf springs. The chassis and suspension of the second generation were greatly refined in both performance and comfort; base models offered significant advances in sound-proofing, ride isolation, and road-holding. Extensive experience Chevrolet engineers had gained racing the first-generation led directly to advances in second-generation Camaro steering, braking, and balance.[4] Although it began its run with a number of high-performance configurations, as the 1970s progressed, the Camaro grew less powerful, succumbing, like many production cars of the era, to the pressures of tightening emissions regulations and a fuel crisis. Major styling changes were made in 1974 and 1978; 1981 was the final model year for the second-generation Camaro.


Chevrolet Camaro
(second generation)
1970 camaro z28.jpg
Overview
Manufacturer General Motors
Production 1970–1981
Model years 1970–1981
Assembly Van Nuys, California
Norwood, Ohio
Body and chassis
Class Pony car
Muscle car
Body style 2-door coupé
Layout FR layout
Platform GM F platform
Related Pontiac Firebird
Powertrain
Engine 3.8 L V6
3.8 L I6
4.1 L I6
5.0 L V8
5.7 L V8
6.5 L V8
6.6 L V8
Transmission 2-speed or 3-speed automatic
3-speed or 4-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase 108 in (2,743.2 mm)
Length 188.0 in (4,775.2 mm)
Width 74.4 in (1,889.8 mm)
Height 50.1 in (1,272.5 mm)
Curb weight 3,310 lb (1,501.4 kg)
Chronology
Predecessor Chevrolet Camaro (first generation)
Successor Chevrolet Camaro (third generation)
The second-generation Chevrolet Camaro was produced by Chevrolet from 1970 through the 1981 model years. It was introduced in the spring of 1970[1] Build information for model 123-12487[2] was released to the assembly plants in February of that same year. It was longer, lower, and wider than the first generation Camaro. A convertible body-type was no longer available.[3] GM engineers have said the second generation is much more of "A Driver's Car" than its predecessor.[4]


Contents
1 History
1.1 Overview
1.2 Models and changes 1970–1981
1.2.1 1970
1.2.2 1971
1.2.3 1972
1.2.4 1973
1.2.5 1974
1.2.6 1975
1.2.7 1976
1.2.8 1977
1.2.9 1978
1.2.10 1979
1.2.11 1980
1.2.12 1981
2 References
3 External links
History
Overview
Dubbed "Super Hugger",[1] the second-generation Camaro was developed without the rush of the first generation and benefited from a greater budget justified by the success of the first generation.[citation needed] Although it was an all-new car, the basic mechanical layout of the new Camaro was familiar, engineered much like its predecessor with a unibody structure utilizing a front subframe, A-arm and coil spring front suspension, and rear leaf springs. The chassis and suspension of the second generation were greatly refined in both performance and comfort; base models offered significant advances in sound-proofing, ride isolation, and road-holding. Extensive experience Chevrolet engineers had gained racing the first-generation led directly to advances in second-generation Camaro steering, braking, and balance.[4] Although it began its run with a number of high-performance configurations, as the 1970s progressed, the Camaro grew less powerful, succumbing, like many production cars of the era, to the pressures of tightening emissions regulations and a fuel crisis. Major styling changes were made in 1974 and 1978; 1981 was the final model year for the second-generation Camaro.

Models and changes 1970–1981

1970 Chevrolet Camaro
Most of the engine and drivetrain components were carried over from 1969, with the exception of the 230 cu in (3.8 L) six-cylinder — the base engine was now the 250 cu in (4.1 L) six, rated at 155 hp (116 kW). The 1970 Camaro SS 396 had the 396 cu in (6.5 L) L78 rated at 350 hp (261 kW). Starting in 1970, the big block V8s (nominally 396 cu in (6.5 L)) actually displaced 402 cu in (6.6 L), yet Chevrolet chose to retain the 396 badges, equipped with a single 4-barrel Holley carburetor that produced 375 bhp (380 PS; 280 kW) at 5,600 rpm and 415 lb·ft (563 N·m) at 3,600 rpm of torque.[5] Two 454 cu in (7.4 L) engines (the LS6 and LS7) were listed on early specification sheets and in some sales brochures but never made it into production. Besides the base model, buyers could select the Rally Sport option with a distinctive nose and bumper, a Super Sport package, and the Z-28 Special Performance Package (priced at US$572.95) featuring a new high-performance LT-1 360 hp (268 kW) 380 lb·ft (520 N·m) of torque 350 cu in (5.7 L) V8. The LT-1, an engine built from the ground up using premium parts and components, was a much better performer overall than the previous 302 cu in (4.9 L) V8s used in 1967-69 Z-28s; greater torque and less-radical cam, coupled with the 780 cfm Holley four-barrel, permitted the Z-28 to be available with the 3-speed Turbo Hydramatic 400 automatic transmission as an option to the four-speed manual for the first time. The LT-1 engine in the 1970 Camaro Z-28 came from the Corvette.

The new body style featured a fastback roofline and ventless full-door glass with no rear side quarter windows. Doors were wider to permit easier access to the rear seat, and new pull-up handles replaced the old handles, for which the lower button had to be pushed in to open the door. The roof was a new double-shell unit for improved rollover protection and noise reduction. The base model featured a separate bumper/grille design with parking lights under the bumper, while the Rally Sport option included a distinctive grille surrounded by a flexible Endura material along with round parking lights beside the headlights and bumperettes surrounding on both sides of the grille. The rear was highlighted by four round taillights similar to the Corvette. A convertible was not offered, making this the only Camaro generation not to offer one.

The 1970, often referred to as a 70½ because the first 1970 Camaros didn't hit show floors until February 1970, was the first Camaro offered with a rear stabilizer bar. The four-wheel disc brake option (RPO JL8 of 1969) was dropped.

Inside, a new curved instrument panel featured several round dials for gauges and other switches directly in front of the driver while the lower section included the heating/air conditioning controls to the driver's left and radio, cigarette lighter and ashtray in the center and glovebox door on the right. New Strato bucket seats, unique to 1970 models, featured squared-off seatbacks and adjustable headrests, and the rear seating consisted of two bucket cushions and a bench seat back due to the higher transmission tunnel. The optional center console, with standard Hurst shifter,[1] was now integrated into the lower dashboard with small storage area or optional stereo tape player. The standard interior featured all-vinyl upholstery and a matte black dashboard finish, while an optional custom interior came with upgraded cloth or vinyl upholstery and woodgrain trim on dash and console.

The 1970 model was introduced to the assembly plants in February 1970, halfway through the model year. This caused some people to refer to it as a "1970½." model; all were 1970 models. The 1970 model year vehicles are generally regarded as the most desirable of the early second-generation Camaros, since the performance of following years was reduced by the automobile emissions control systems of the period and later the addition of heavy federally mandated bumpers.


Visit Coupe De LA LA online at coupedelala.net to see more pictures of this vehicle or call us at 256-486-3755 today to schedule your test drive.

Vehicle Inquiry for 1970 Chevrolet Camaro Z28


Inquiry Photo

1970

Chevrolet

Camaro

Z28

27,328

Automatic

124870N532367

CDLL201852

350 360 HP

Vinyl

Yellow

2WD

American Muscle Car

AL

Share with a Friend


Message: Thought you might be interested in this 1970 Chevrolet Camaro.

Make Offer


1970 Chevrolet Camaro Z28

27,328 miles, 2WD, 8 Cyl 350 360 HP

Vehicle Image
ASKING PRICE

$50,000

Vehicle Disclaimer

While every effort has been made to ensure display of accurate data, the vehicle listings within this website may not reflect all accurate vehicle items. All Inventory listed is subject to prior sale. The vehicle photo displayed may be an example only. Please see the dealer for details. Vehicles may be in transit or currently in production. Some vehicles are shown with optional equipment. See the actual vehicle for complete accuracy of features, options & pricing. Because of the numerous possible combinations of vehicle models, styles, colors, and options, the vehicle pictures on this site may not match your vehicle exactly; however, it will match as closely as possible. Some vehicle images shown are stock photos and may not reflect your exact choice of vehicle, color, trim and specification. Not responsible for pricing or typographical errors.

All information pertaining to these vehicles should be independently verified through the dealer.

The above-mentioned vehicle is sold as seen, buyer understands that should a purchase decision be made, any purchase is with the understanding that the vehicle is sold “AS IS” without warranties or guarantees, either expressed or implied.

Share to Social Media